Five Things I Learned About Art From Seeing Shearwater Live

This past weekend in San Francisco, I went to see my favorite band, Shearwater, perform live at Bottom Of The Hill. I was worried I’d be disappointed; that somehow their live performance wouldn’t live up to the music I’d grown to love on their albums. I’ve been disappointed by bands I’d been in love with…

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Porous, Chapter Five: Haunted

First of all, allow me to say that it’s somewhat unbelievable how far this story has come from its humble beginnings as a forgotten passage in a lost folder on my hard drive. Every chapter is a revelation for me as well as for you, and every suggestion I get from my readers is incredibly…

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Book Review: “Hunger” By Knut Hamsun

I’ve been trying to add more quote-unquote literature to my repertoire of finished books. When I was a child I hated reading anything set in the real world. I found books without magic or elves or talking animals to be unbearably boring, and I had no desire to read anything that had any sort of…

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Book Review: The General In His Labyrinth by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Here again is another book about death. I apologize for reading such morbid books recently, especially around the holiday season, but there you are. It can’t be helped. The General In His Labyrinth is a departure from Gabriel Garcia Marquez’ typical subject, or so I am told. His writing style, normally in the magical realism world…

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Book Review: Infinite Jest, Truly

Infinite Jest is, no joke, a work of near-infinity and plentiful jest. Weighing in at 981 pages, not to mention another 98 of microscopic-font-size footnotes, at the beginning the book was a hassle to read just because of the challenge of balancing it on my chest as I was reading in bed. I quickly relegated it…

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Write, Because No One Else Can Save You

The last few weeks have been rough. Not like, ‘my parents were hit by a bus’ rough. Not like, ‘I or someone close to me was diagnosed with cancer’ rough. Not like, ‘The bank reclaimed our house and we’re living out of our car’ rough. Nothing anywhere near that drastic, I assure you. I am…

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Divergence in Dystopia: A Comparison Study

This is a guest post by Kevin Weitzel.  In September of 2008, Scholastic had no idea that what they had just released would become a worldwide phenomenon. Since then, The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins has been recognized as a global sensation that’s changed the lives of millions. Hitting the New York Times Bestselling Lists…

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Book Review: “Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley

BRAVE NEW WORLD is considered a classic in literature, a book students are often required to read in high school,  a story that shows the limitations and complexities of utopian/dystopian society. I was told that I had to read it because of the immense similarities between it and my own debut novel, THE SOWING. So naturally, I…

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Symbols Are Power

I remember spending an inordinate amount of time in my freshman year high school class discussing symbolism. “But what does the albatross symbolize?” we were asked about the Rime of the Ancient Mariner. “But what does the snake represent?” we were asked about D.H. Lawrence’s famous poem. “But what does Antigone’s burial ceremony mean?” At the time, I…

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Dystopia On Demand

This is a guest post by Kurt McCrohan. Execution by combat, globally spread degenerative disease, and a bleak, desolate landscape challenging human survival. Sounds familiar, and there’s a reason for that. These are but a few examples of the themes which have been dominating the most recent popular films and novels, and while they are…

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